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OVALBUY Ox Bone Carved Elephant Pendant Necklace at 603.00 PHP from Takatack
OVALBUY Ox Bone Carved Elephant Pendant Necklace
₱ 603.00
Takatack
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OVALBUY 108 Ox Bone Skull Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace at 2056.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 Ox Bone Skull Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
₱ 2,056.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Each bead carved with Skull. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Each bead carved with Skull. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras.
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OVALBUY Ox Bone Carved Elephant Pendant Necklace at 603.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY Ox Bone Carved Elephant Pendant Necklace
₱ 603.00
Galleon
Ox bone elephant pendant necklace
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Ox bone elephant pendant necklace
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OVALBUY 8mm Tiger Eye Beads Rosary Prayer Meditation 108 Japa Mala Necklace at 1350.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm Tiger Eye Beads Rosary Prayer Meditation 108 Japa Mala Necklace
₱ 1,350.00
Galleon
This mala made of 108 8mm tiger eye beads. Each beads were handpicked by us and strung on a quality string. It is good meditation and counting practice.
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This mala made of 108 8mm tiger eye beads. Each beads were handpicked by us and strung on a quality string. It is good meditation and counting practice.
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OVALBUY 6mm 108 Multiple Color Agate Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace at 810.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 6mm 108 Multiple Color Agate Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace
₱ 810.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 108 White Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace at 655.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 White Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace
₱ 655.00
Galleon
Buddhist prayer beads are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited whilst meditating. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads used in various world religions thus some call this tool the Buddhist rosary.
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Buddhist prayer beads are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited whilst meditating. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads used in various world religions thus some call this tool the Buddhist rosary.
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OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace at 1118.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace
₱ 1,118.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 6mm Tibetan Buddhist 108 Sandalwood Beads Prayer Mala Necklace at 732.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 6mm Tibetan Buddhist 108 Sandalwood Beads Prayer Mala Necklace
₱ 732.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 8mm 108 Blue White Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace at 1118.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm 108 Blue White Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
₱ 1,118.00
Galleon
8mm 108 Blue White Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
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8mm 108 Blue White Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
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OVALBUY 108 Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace at 655.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace
₱ 655.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras.
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OVALBUY 8mm Multi-color Beads 108 Tibetan Buddhist Mala Necklace for Meditation at 1041.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm Multi-color Beads 108 Tibetan Buddhist Mala Necklace for Meditation
₱ 1,041.00
Galleon
This necklace mala use different kind of beads (material and color are different). The guru beads is a big agate. It's unique design make your pray counting and mediation a special experience.
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This necklace mala use different kind of beads (material and color are different). The guru beads is a big agate. It's unique design make your pray counting and mediation a special experience.
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OVALBUY 8mm Multiple Color Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace at 654.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm Multiple Color Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
₱ 654.00
Galleon
8mm 108 Multiple Color Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
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8mm 108 Multiple Color Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
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OVALBUY 8mm 108 Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace at 810.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm 108 Wood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace
₱ 810.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY Green Sandalwood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace at 810.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY Green Sandalwood Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation Mala Necklace
₱ 810.00
Galleon
This mala has a light fragrance. Buddhist prayer beads are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited whilst meditating. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads used in various world religions thus some call this tool the Buddhist rosary.
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This mala has a light fragrance. Buddhist prayer beads are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited whilst meditating. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads used in various world religions thus some call this tool the Buddhist rosary.
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OVALBUY 6mm 108 Multiple Color Stone Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace at 655.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 6mm 108 Multiple Color Stone Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace
₱ 655.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
Read more
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 8mm Heat Treated Agate Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation 108 Mala Necklace at 1195.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm Heat Treated Agate Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Meditation 108 Mala Necklace
₱ 1,195.00
Galleon
The mala made of agate beads. We handpicked the beads and make sure the quality is good.
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The mala made of agate beads. We handpicked the beads and make sure the quality is good.
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OVALBUY 8mm 108 Multiple Color and Multiple Material Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace at 976.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm 108 Multiple Color and Multiple Material Beads Buddhist Prayer Rosary Mala Necklace
₱ 976.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace at 1118.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace
₱ 1,118.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
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OVALBUY 8mm 108 Black Heat Treated Agate Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace at 1118.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 8mm 108 Black Heat Treated Agate Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace
₱ 1,118.00
Galleon
This mala made of 108 8mm agate beads. Each beads were hand picked by us and strung on a quality string. It is good for meditation and counting practice.
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This mala made of 108 8mm agate beads. Each beads were hand picked by us and strung on a quality string. It is good for meditation and counting practice.
Go to Shop
Go to Shop
OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace at 1118.00 PHP from Galleon
OVALBUY 108 Vintage Style Porcelain Beads Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Japa Mala Necklace
₱ 1,118.00
Galleon
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.
Read more
A Japa mala or mala (meaning garland) is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists, usually made from 108 beads, though other numbers, usually divisible by 9, are also used. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 19, 21, 27, 54 or 108 beads. In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations, the extra repetitions done to amend any mistakes in pronunciation or other faults of recitation. Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from 'Bodhi' seeds, which is a misnomer as the seeds are from a tree related to the Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus) and not the Bodhi tree (being a fig tree, its seeds are inside a tiny fig, and are minuscule). The scientific name of this tree, native to Nepal, is yet to be determined. Another general-purpose mala is made from another unknown seed, the beads themselves called 'Moon and Stars' by Tibetans, and variously called 'lotus root', 'lotus seed' and 'linden nut' by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.

OVALBUY Jewellery Philippines

Among the most popular OVALBUY Jewellery today are Ox Bone Carved Elephant Pendant Necklace and 108 Ox Bone Skull Beads Buddhist Prayer Mala Necklace. You can check the products of Blue Tulip Boutique, HKS and MagiDeal if you’re not sure about purchasing OVALBUY Jewellery. iprice provides OVALBUY Jewellery from ₱ 603.00 - ₱ 2,056.00. You can find two types of OVALBUY Jewellery online, particularly Necklaces; you can choose the one that suits your need. For colors, White, Green and Blue are amongst the popular shades when it comes to OVALBUY Jewellery.

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